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Full text of "Your home of burned clay masonry."

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7 



YOUR HOME 



OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 



PRICE .25* 




JUt 

Beauty • Economy 

Id* 



PLANS OF MODERATE 
COST HOUSES BUILT WITH 
STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS 

Permanency 



vffe 





J 



This booklet has been prepared to aid those who are planning to 
build a new home to understand and appreciate the qualities of 
beauty, economy, durability and fire-safety which modern burned 
clay products can contribute to any type of house. It is published 
in the interests of better building and better living by 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE 

(INC.) 

1427 Eye Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 



Ill Mi II In This Creat Tradition 






:2^ 



WPr 




HAND in hand with man's never-ending efforts to build a 
better world has moved his reliance on brick to give form, 
strength and beauty to his homes, his temples and his city's walls. 
Built of burned clay, these withstood alike the assaults of his 
enemies and the ravages of time. To these structures he entrusted 
not only the welfare of his family, but the safekeeping of the 
history of his race — its victories, accomplishments and progress. 
In the walls themselves is the history of the art of building — the 
art of transforming clay into enduring brick and tile. And through 
the centuries he has passed down to us that which is of greater 
importance than all kings and battles, all great migrations and 
voyages of discovery — a time-proven method of home building. 



Is it not enough for us to know, when we build our homes of burned clay, that homes so 
built in Colonial days are still as beautiful, substantial and useful as ever? When Thomas 
Jefferson, architect as well as statesman, chose brick, he too looked across a century to the 
England of Queen Elizabeth, And the great builders of that resplendent day profited by the 
examples of ages still more remote — back to the Crusades, to the days of Caesar's Legions, to 
Egypt and the Children of Israel, to Chaldea in the Valley of the Euphrates. 

So each succeeding age has looked back to that which came before and taken whatever proved 
good and made it better. Much was abandoned as new customs, new discoveries, new methods 
came into being. Always burned clay remained. This, in every age, proved good and was made 
better. The brick of ancient daj^s would seem crude to us, poorly 
formed as they were and dried in the sun for want of a better way. 
But presently some genius devised the kiln, and brick became still 
harder, more impervious, more durable. 

Then science found new methods of using qualities of burned 
clay to form structural building units, commonly known as 
structural clay tile. Further advances produced new surfaces and 
new finishes on brick and tile, including many decorative textures 
and new colors and enduring glazes unknown to the ancients. 
Today the methods and means of science have brought to the 
making of these burned clay products a precision and control 
which, even a short time ago, would have seemed unimaginable. 
Today, we who build in this great tradition have available at low 
cost better brick, better tile, more beautiful textures and colors 
and a better knowledge of the art of using them in a well built 
home than man has ever had before. 




The permanence of 
products is attested 
well, built in Asia 
below, pictographs 
methods of clay 



structural clay 
by this ancient 
in 1600 b. a 5 
show ancient 
construction 



1 3 




COPYRIGHT, 1937, BY STRUCTURAL, CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, INC. 




Build Tomorrow's Home — Today 



When Hezakiali Haskell built this brick house at East Windsor, Connecticut, he 
used brick because his own ancestors had long ago proved its beauty, durability 
and lasting economy. After a century and a quarter of constant use, it stands 
today a treasured model for modern homes. Your own home, too, can have all this 
charm and stability. In addition it can reflect the economy, the varied colors and 
textures and the new forms that science has brought to modern structural clay 
products. Build today with these materials; tomorrow vour home will still be new 



For Economy, For Permanence 

... For Beauty 



TO build his house well and truly ; to provide a se- 
cure and pleasant home for himself and his fam- 
ily; and yet to do this with sensible economy is the 
aim of the home-builder. Never has there been a time 
when that ambition could be so readily achieved as 
today. A wealth of equipment and materials is within 
the reach of all, fitting every need and every purse, 
many of them tested by years of hard service in actual 
use under conditions which prove their worth. Among 
these materials, none has a longer record of splendid 
service and enduring beauty than have brick and clay 
tile in all their varied forms. 

These modern products of an ancient craft have 
never lost their youth. As you read this book, you may 
well ask yourself whether all the resources of modern 
science — had there been no such thing as a brick or 
a tile — could have invented anything to serve you so 
well, to fit so easily into every required job and still 
be so low in cost. 

Some people who would greatly prefer to build 
their home of burned clay products have the mistaken 
notion that these are too expensive to use. Because 
economy is such a very important item, let us see 
whether we can afford the strength, permanence and 
beauty that clay products give to our home. 

We can give figures on this subject because tests 
have been made by organizations who were interested 
in finding out the true cost of using different mate- 
rials in the walls of a house. For example, the Archi- 
tects Small House Service Bureau asked for contrac- 
tors' bids on different types of walls for the same 
house plan. They found that a solid brick wall would 
cost just $112 more than all-frame construction. That 
$112 represented less than 2 per cent of the total cost 
of the home. In another case, it was discovered 
through a very detailed survey that first-cost figures 
on a home showed it coidd be built of wood for $4,238; 
of brick veneer (over wood frame) for $4,460; of 
brick on hollow tile for $4,483; and of solid brick for 
$4,oo5. Again, , the use of burned clay products in- 
volved only slightly higher first cost. 

But the first cost is not the final cost. Let us see if 
brick is not really cheaper within a period of, say, ten 
years. The Structural Clay Products Institute wanted 
to find out what a house valued at $5,000 would cost 
at the end of ten years. Like any wise home owner, it 
was thinking of upkeep, insurance and depreciation. 
The results of an actual study are shown in the accom- 
panying table. 

Comparing these figures with the added first cost of 
brick and tile, we find that the savings in depreciation, 
insurance and painting, over the ten year period, re- 
turned the slight extra cost with interest and in addi- 
tion showed a substantial profit to the owner. The 
actual figures might vary somewhat in different sec- 
tions of the country, but they give an accurate indica- 



Solid Brick oi 


Brick 




B 


ick & Tile 


Veneer 


Frame 


Fire insurance rate on 








house: $5,000 for ten 








year period 


$103.13 


$ 15(). 75 


$ 205.75 


Insurance rate on con- 








tents: $2,500 for ten 








year period 


78.38 


07.50 


127.88 


Depreciation: Solid brick 








y 2 % per year, veneer 








iy s % per year, frame 








3% per year 


244.41 


701.31 


1,312.87 


Painting : Three times dur- 








ing a ten vear period, 








frame $155.00 each job, 








brick $70.00 each job, 








best gra de m a t e r i a 1 








used 


210.00 
$635.92 


210.00 


465.00 


$1,165.56 


$2,111.50 


NOTE — Insurance rates on houses 


ary widely 


in different c 


oiiiinunities. 


Yearly rates used here are, for house: SO. 25 per $100. for 


solid brick; 


SO. 38 per S100. for veneer and S0.50 per S100. 


for frame. F 


or contents: 


S0.38; =0.18 and S0.62 per S100. f 


:>r solid hri 


:k, veneer ar 


d frame re- 


spec-lively. These are as fait avera 


^es as arc o 


htainable from insurance 


authorities. 









tion of the advantages of an enduring material which 
requires little or no maintenance. 

From the standpoint of economy, brick and clay tile 
are ideal; we can afford to use them if we can afford 
a house at all. But we want to know more about a 
material than merely its economy. Are clay products 
permanent, strong, safe from fire or damage by the 
elements ? Are they attractive materials, giving beauty 
and harmony to every home in which they are wisely 
and carefully used? 

When we consider the record of the ancient build- 
ings whose walls, arched gateways and vaulted ceil- 
ings were of brick, there can be little doubt as to the 
strength, beauty and permanence of this material and 
its ability to resist the elements. As to fire-safety, all 
clay products are born of fire. Hardened and tem- 
pered in kilns which often attain a heat of 2200 de- 
grees Fahrenheit, they give you and your family the 
protection of materials which cannot be destroyed by 
flames. 

This brings us to the consideration of how burned 
clay should be used to give best results, both in sound 
construction and in attractive appearance. Too often 
we overlook opportunities when building with brick or 
clay tile, simply because we have not realized the 
variety of color and texture which is offered, or the 
ways in which they may be used to yield a better wall. 
But we must give intelligent study and thought to 
these matters, before even a brick is bought, ki order 
to get the greatest possible satisfaction and pleasure 
from the home we build. 

In the following pages we shall talk in plain terms 
of what to do and how to do it, what to avoid and what 
to insist upon. Like many other things, doing a good 
job of building is really easy — when you know the 
little details that make it good. 



3 



YOUR HOME 



OF BURNED 



CLAY MASONRY 



Terms Your Architect and Builder Use 



YOUR HOME 
OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 




GENERAL 

Masonry Construction 

— The safest, most perma- 
nent type of residential 
construction is that in 
which walls and hasement 
partitions are built of any 
type of burned clay struc- 
tural units, as brick or tile. 
"Walls may contain air 
spaces, depending upon the 
type of unit used or the 
maimer in which the wall is constructed. Durability of 
these walls is beyond question. Floors and even roofs 
may be of reinforced tile or brick or a combination of 
hollow tile and concrete. 

Veneer Construction — This is a combination of 
wood or steel framing faced with brick or tile. With 
steel framing, shrinkage and subsequent damage to 
interior finish is minimized and fire-safety increased. 
Wood frames are of three types: 1. Balloon framing; 
2. Braced framing; and 3. Western, Combination or 
Platform framing. Balloon framing is most desirable 
for veneer construction as it minimizes shrinkage on 
outside walls. In this construction uprights, or "studs" 
are continuous and floor framing members, or joists, 
are nailed to them, supported on a thin horizontal strip 
called a "ledger board," or "ribbon". 

TERMS USED IN MASONRY 
CONSTRUCTION 

Bat — A portion of a brick (usually y 2 or more), 
used to fill voids. 

Bond — Structurally, the method of laying brick or 
clay tile to give vertical and lateral strength to the 
wall. Architecturally, in brickwork, different bonding 
methods produce various wall patterns such as Com- 
mon, English, Flemish, etc., thus allowing a variety of 
texture effects. (See illustrations, page 11). 

Header Course — Row of brick laid flat or on edge 
with ends exposed in the face of a wall. 

Joint — The mortar-filled space between burned clay 
units. Different types of joints, as weathered, struck, 
tooled, etc. (see illustrations, page 10) influence tex- 
ture of wall surface. Brick joints normally range in 
thickness from % inch to % inches. 

Bolok course — Brick laid on edge 
instead of on its flat bed, the flat bed 
or the end being exposed. 

Soldier course — Row of brick 
stood on end with edge exposed. 

Stretcher course — Row of brick 
or clay tile laid in a wall flat and end 
to end with edge exposed. 

FOUNDATIONS 

Back Fill — Material used to fill in excavation out- 
side of basement walls. Over drain tile the back fill 
should be coarse gravel followed by layers of finer 
gravel, with a 6" surface of sand and top soil. 

Dampproofing— A means of preventing water, not 
under pressure, from working by capillary attraction 
or otherwise, through exterior walls. Normally, two 
or more coatings of pitch or asphalt applied on the ex- 
terior of foundations below grade or occasionally on 
the interior of masonry walls above grade. 






Drain Tile — Circular clay tile 
pipes usually a foot long, normally 
laid with open joints around the out- 
side of the basement wall beside the 
footings. When properly connected 
to a suitable drainage line they serve 
to carry away excessive ground 
water. 



Floor Slab — On dry or well drained soils the floor 
slab may be of brick or tile laid on tamped cinders, 
sand or rough concrete base. When water is present 
floor slab should be properly waterproofed and rein- 
forced if necessary. 



Footings — Supports for founda- 
tion or basement walls. They are 
wider than these walls to prevent 
settlement and are made of brick or 
concrete with or without steel rein- 
forcement depending upon ground 
conditions. 



Frost Line — The point below the surface at which 
earth remains unfrozen during cold weather. Footings 
should be built below the frost line for permanent 
stability. 

Grade Line — Location of the ground level after 
grading has been finished. Parts of the house extending 
below the ground level are said to be "below grade." 

Waterproofing — A means of preventing water 
under pressure from seeping into the basement. See 
also Dampproofing. Membrane waterproofing may 
be a coating of pitch or asphalt, with one or more 
layers of felt, usually applied to the exterior of walls 
and covered with a coating of cement mortar. Integral 
waterproofing is a compound such as calcium stearatc 
which is added to mixtures of cement to form water- 
tight concrete. Cement coat waterproofings are 
special coats of cement mortar, usually containing 
iron compounds, applied to interior or exterior 
surfaces of masonry walls. 



WALLS 

Anchors — Long bolts set into walls to secure wood 
or steel framing members. 

Bearing Walls — Those which carry the weight of 
floor and roof. "Non-bearing" walls are those which 
merely enclose space, as partitions. 

Fire-stop — Barriers placed at in- 
tervals across air spaces in wood 
framed walls and floors. Should be 
of incombustible materials, such as 
brick or clay tile, at each floor level 
to stop spread of fire through flues 
created by framing members. Fire- 
stops are essential in any well-built 
frame dwelling. 

Furring Strip — A narrow piece of wood about 1" 
thick secured to a masonry wall and serving as nailing 
base for lath, wallboard or paneling. 

Furring Tile — Are burned clay units, specially de- 
signed to receive plaster and often used in place of 
furring strips and lath. 

Head — The horizontal construction at the top of a 
window or door opening. (See Lintel). 

Jamb — The vertical construction at the sides of a 
door or window opening. 




Lintel — Structural supporting member spanning a 
door or window opening at the head. 

Plate — Horizontal framing member of wood or 
metal which provides support for roof framing mem- 
bers. In frame construction it secures studs at their 
upper end. 

Sheathing — Wood boards or rigid fiber boards 
nailed to outer face of studs in veneer construction. 

Sill— Horizontal construction at bottom of door and 
window openings, also horizontal framing member of 
wood or metal which rests on top of and is anchored 
to the foundation walls. 



FIREPLACES 

Chimney Breast— Surface of con- 
struction that surrounds fireplace 
opening. 

Chimney Pot— A sort of pipe 
made of burned clay in various forms 
and designs (square, round, etc.) to 
add height to a chimney, to serve as 
a decorative accent and to increase 
draft. 

Damper- Metal frame fitted with adjustable flap 
to regulate opening from fireplace to smoke chamber. 
Installed in fireplace throat. 

Flue— Hollow area in chimney through which smoke 
passes. It should be lined with vitrified clay flue tile 
available in round, square or oblong shapes. Flue lin- 
ings are essential for fire-safety. 

Hearth — The fireproof area in 
front of the fireplace; usually built 
of brick or clay tile to harmonize 
with fireplace. The "back hearth" is 
the floor of the fireplace itself. 

Trimmer Arch— Arched construc- 
tion of brick or clay tile that sup- 
ports the hearth. 






FLOORS 

Bridging— Series of structural ele- 
ments of wood, strap metal or wire 
secured to joists. Bridging extends 
from the top of one joist to the bot- 
tom of an adjacent one and con- 
tributes rigidity to floor construction. 
Also used between studs to stiffen 
walls. 

Joist — Transverse structural floor 
members between walls or beams 
which support the floor surface. 



ROOF 

Dormer — Construction breaking 
into roof surface to provide window. 

Flashing — Strips of metal laid 
under or over roofing at critical 
points, such as at valleys, at edge of 
roof, at intersection of roof and 
chimney, etc., to form a permanent 
watertight joint. 

Gutter — Horizontal trough, to collect water and 
dispose of it through connection to downspout of 
leader. Built-in gutter is usually concealed in cornice 
construction. Hanging gutter is secured to roof by 
metal straps and hung below eaves. 

Pitch — The angle at which a roof slopes. Even a 
so-called flat roof has a slight pitch to provide drainage. 

Ridge — The peak of the roof; also a structural 
member, running the length of the ridge, to which the 
rafters are fastened. 

Splash Block — Trough of cement 
or burned clay below downspout to 
carry water away from foundation 
walls. Used when downspouts cannot 
be connected to storm drains. 

Valley— The trough formed when 
two pitched roofs intersect; also that 
formed between roof and dormer. 






Kn 
Ho 



THE more you 
know about the 
home you are build- 
ing, the more enjoy- 
ment you will derive 
from the building of 
it and the more pride 
you will have in the ownership of the finished house. 
Know your home. Know how the stout masonry walls 
are built, how the roof is framed and the floors laid. 
Know what is visible to the eye and as much as possible 
about what is hidden underground or within the walls. 
It is a worthwhile study and an enjoyable one. 

Each part of your home lias its own definite function 
to perform and no essential part can be more important 
than another. To become familiar with the important 



ow How Your 
use Is Built 



parts of your house, their functions and the terms 
applied to them, study this glossary of building terms. 

We have divided the essential parts of the house ac- 
cording to their position and the work they do., so that 
if your builder, in discussing foundation walls, for ex- 
ample, or the construction of a fireplace, should use 
unfamiliar terms, you may refer to these pages for a 
definition and explanation. You will be well repaid for 
the time spent in reading each item, as you will be able 
to ask specific questions regarding the planning and 
construction of your home. You will learn what 
materials go into it and bow well they are used. 

Furthermore, you will discover that building a home 
is grand fun — a game played skillfully according to 
tested rules. And you will find helpful teammates in 
your material dealer, builder and architect. 



YOUR HOME 
OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 



6 



YOUR HOM E 
OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 



BASEMENTS should be as 
useful and attractive as 
any other part of a house. Game 
rooms, card rooms, hobby shops, 
can make good use of areas not 
required for heating equipment 
and other utilities. On the oppo- 
site page is illustrated a base- 
ment recreation room with both 
walls and floor of brick in varie- 
gated colors and textures 










IN the drawing at the right are shown important things to 
consider during the construction of your house. The one 
at the left above shows membrane waterproofing, which is 
necessary only when any type of masonry walls or floors is 
under pressure from sub-surface water. Dampproofing, 
used when ground water is not under pressure, is indicated 
on the same detail. Beside it are indicated some of the 
many possibilities of developing finished surfaces on the 
basement interior. Below is a perspective of burned clay 
c< nisi nut ion showing the use of these products for footings, 
floorings, drainage, piers and partitions. Note that brick and 
structural clay tile are frequently interchangeable in the 
construction shown. Both can be obtained in glazed and 
textured surfaces and in a range of beautiful colors 



By using burned clay products, structural walls, parti- 
tions and supports can be made as decorative and attrac- 
tive as they are useful. Above, are walls of structural clay 
tile with a smooth, colorful surface texture and directly 
below it a floor structure of precast reinforced clay tile 
beams. One of the rooms at the left is finished in light-tone 
brick and the laundry below has walls of glazed tile and a 
floor of wear-resistant floor brick 



&Umd fca lib aiave grade cptic.iaL 




FOUNDATION 
WATERPROOFING 



Plaster on metal lath for 
fire retarding, c optional) 



Onder fill 
BASEMENT INTERIOR FINISHES 



-f'T Bp^.fc 

I Jr 




On damp roil use J" No special footing necessary for 12' rail 
bed of I 8 concrete except wnerc concentrated loads occur 



BASEMENT CONSTRUCTION WITH BURNED CLAY MASONRY 




Comfort— and A Firm Foundation 



BASEMENTS have come into a new era within 
recent years, largely owing to the perfection of 
modern heating equipment. Today the modern home 
builder plans and builds his basement so that it be- 
comes a useful feature in his house, attractive and 
comfortable, providing for a generous hobby room, 
play room or study ; in addition to accommodating the 
compact heater and a clean, sanitary laundry. 

Burned clay products — that is, brick and structural 
clay tile — are excellent materials for the construction 
of foundation walls and basement partitions. They 
combine strength, durability, fire-safety and offer a 
wide range of beautiful colors and surface textures. 
Choice between the many forms of these products is 
governed largely by the type of interior finish yon 
desire. A clean-looking, well-finished basement is al- 
ways desirable and increases the market value of the 
house. But if you are planning special uses for base- 
ment areas you have a choice of burned clay prod- 
ucts to obtain the exact finish you prefer. 

In basement recreation rooms, for example, you may 
want a richly colorful textured wall. Brick, or glazed 
ware is then indicated, using the chosen colors, finishes 
and textures on the inner face, backed up by brick or 
structural clay tile. In laundries, toilets, shower or fur- 
nace rooms, you may want a sanitary washable wall 
surface, offered alike by glazed brick and tile. 

If you desire a plastered surface, structural clay tile 



may be used to receive plaster direct if your home is 
being built in a warm, comparatively dry climate. Plas- 
ter may also be applied over furring tile or on lath 
secured to furring strips (see Glossary, pages 4 and 
5). Furring of any sort creates an air space between 
the structural wall and finished surface as shown in 
the upper right-hand drawing on page 6. Various types 
of insulating boards can also be used as a basement fin- 
ish. They can be left plain or can be plastered or 
painted as desired. 

Structurally, brick or clay tile are equally good to 
use for basement walls and floors. Wall thickness is 
largely determined by building code requirements and 
by soil conditions in your locality. For most houses of 
moderate size an 8" basement wall is adequate. But in 
sandy or unstable soils, a 12" thickness is preferred. 

If your locality is a wet one, water may collect under 
the surface of the ground and exert a pressure against 
basement construction, which may be strong enough to 
seep through any common type of structural material. 
Under such conditions it is good practice to coat the 
outer surfaces of basement walls with mortar, contain- 
ing a compound known as "stearate waterproofing". 
When unusually wet conditions are encountered, it is 
best to coat walls and rough basement floors with a 
"membrane waterproofing" of layers of felt coated 
with pitch or asphalt mopped on while hot. This mem- 
brane is usually covered with a film of cement. 



YOUR HOME 
OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 



Sturdy Constriction- Forever 



YOUR home will be forever sturdy if you build the 
walls as well as foundations of burned clay prod- 
ucts. And among the advantages of clay masonry con- 
struction are fire-safety, enduring beauty and lasting- 
economy. 

A wide choice of burned clay types and sizes, colors 
and textures is available to you. The walls of your 
home may be of brick, built either as a solid or hollow 
wall; of brick backed up with structural clay tile; brick 
veneer over wood or steel framing, or of clay tile alone. 



The latter can form the exterior finish of your home 
if you choose the type that has a glazed or hard burned 
face. Another type of clay tile is made to receive stucco 
on the exterior and plaster inside. 

Each type of wall is permanent, and requires no 
expense to maintain. Interior finish of any type you 
desire can be used with burned clay walls. Plaster or 
paneling is usually applied over furring. This allows a 
small space for air circulation between finish and wall 
construction and adds insulation. 



(htrtg'Us 




Brick Facing with 
Clay Tile Backing 



MiM. 
fuller 




Solid Brick 
or Clav Tile 




Oi-j:;'d,r 




Brick Facing with 
Brick or Tile Backing 



Brick Veneer witli 
Wood Framing 



VOUR HOME 
3 F BURNED 

:lay masonry 



To develop fully the values of 
burned clay construction, brick 
or tile should be carefully laid. 
Poor workmanship, such as that 
illustrated in the right hand pic- 
ture, may produce a leaky wall. 
The burned clay units should be 
fully imbedded in cement-lime 
mortar like those shown in the 
left hand picture. If properly 
laid, units of brick and hollow 
tile, used singly or in combina- 
tions as illustrated in the wall 
sections above, will produce a 
durable weather-resisting struc- 
ture, as is indicated by tests 
made by Federal departments 





.-. -^ , <-«k 









af-o 



- * /"'T^jfef . dr:,W JMji ihW- ^ 




THE charming entrance shown 
liere could be built in a va- 
riety of ways as illustrated in the 
diagrams at the right and at the 
bottom of the page. For the ma- 
jority of small houses an 8" wall 
of either of the types shown at the 
right is suitable and economical. 
The left hand drawing shows the 
method of constructing a solid wall 
of brick laid in "common bond" in 
which a row of "headers" ties the 
wall together laterally every sixth 
course. Solid walls can be built in 
a wide variety of bonds to create 
patterns on the face. (See page 
11.) The right hand drawing 
shows another type of all-masonry 
construction in which the facing of 
brick is bonded into and backed up 
by hollow clay tile. Burned clay 
construction is an age-old art com- 
bining strength and durability with 
opportunities for the use of color, 
pattern and texture 





8 SOLID WALL 
OF BRICK 




8 WALL OF BRICK 
AND CLAY TILE 



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■□ 

ma 
■n 



ID 

in 

10 
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!□ 

!□ 



icnn 

■in 



IEZO 
!□□ 
!□□ 

irzo 
~ilq 



!□□ 
!□□ 
IEZHZI 
!□□ 



8' SOLID ll/i- SOLID 

SOLID WALLS OF BRICK 



■■■□ At 

.N " 



y 




9' ROLOXSAK 8 m ALL-ROLOK llft-RQLQK-BAK 

HOLLOW WALLS OF BRICK 



1- 






on cud B BeM 



I81B 



m 



Hollow 
clay— | 
Hies ■ □!< 



8' BSiCi: FACi I2'A 'BRICK FACB 
WALL5 OF BRICK t. CLAY TILE 




fflj 



DDL1 



DD 
DD 

an 



DD 
DD 



fCLAZ£D FACE &-10-ort2-HQLLOW TILC 

STRUCTURAL CLAY TILE WALLS 



These diagrams illustrate the various types of burned clay walls with which your home can be constructed. All 

of them will be forever sturdy, completely fire-safe and will cost nothing to maintain. Choice of a particular type 

depends upon your preference and upon local costs and usage 



9 



YOUR HOME 
OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 




10 



Some indication of the variety of effects obtainable 
in walls of burned clay masonry may be seen on 
these pages. In the house above, for example, struc- 
tural wall tile is used to good advantage in produc- 
ing an attractive and unusual wall texture. Walls 
in the picture at the left are of smooth-surfaced, 
light colored brick, laid in Flemish bond. The same 
type of brick is laid in running or stretcher bond in 
the small house shown in the upper corner picture. 
Below, a bouse in the English tradition has rough- 
textured walls, in harmony with the rugged design 



YOUR HOME 
OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 



The mortar joint is an important 
item in the pattern of a brick 
wall. Above are four frequently 
used types, called (left to right): 
weathered, cut flush, V-tooled, 
and rodded. Joints on which some 
pressure is exerted make the best 
bond between brick and mortar 



The most appropriate brick bond 
for a given house is that which is 
most in harmony with the design 
of the house. Generally speaking, 
the simpler bonds are best for 
residential work. The pleasant 
little house at the left has walls 
of running, or stretcher, bond 
quite in keeping with its quiet 
dignified character. In the detail 
below, the wall is easily identified 
as being laid in Flemish bond 




The Challenge 
of Four Walls 



THE appearance of the exterior walls of a house is 
important and the appearance of a burned clay 
wall is much influenced by the bond employed. "Bond" 
really means the method of binding burned clay prod- 
ucts into an overlapping succession of units, to form 
a strong and rigid wall. But it lias come to designate, 
also, the various patterns which the different bonds 
create on the wall surface. Combined with the variety 
of possible mortar joints, these bonds offer many pos- 
sible surface treatments from which to choose. Per- 
sonal preference and the dictates of architectural style 
have, of course, much to do with the choice. 

Remember that use of burned clay masonry affords 
an enormous variety of possible textures, colors and 
bonds. You should consider carefully with your archi- 
tect and builder which combination is the most appro- 
priate to the home you have in mind. 

In any case, such details as the size of the unit, the 
bond, the width and type of mortar joint, the color and 
texture, represent the artistic side of the use of a 
beautiful and varied material. Great architects of all 
ages have paid close attention to all these points. On 
these pages are suggested the challenge of decorative 
possibilities at your command. 




'____ 



□DO 

pop 

co.vho; 







□ghe^: = ^;^=:~=o=e: 



GARDE!! WALL 



ESKLIi.'f CMJ15 OH DUTCH 



11 



Six types of wall bond. These form the basis of many adap- 
tations with which a skilled designer can give unusual char- 
acter and interest to all types of burned clay masonry walls 



YOUR HOME 
OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 



Fireplaces— Inside and Outside 



Terra corra 
flue 

$moke 




FIREPLACE 
PROPORTIONS 

Fireplace widths (W) can 
range from 2 to 7 feet. 
For best results make 
height (H) 2/3 to 3/4 of 
width; and depth 1/2 to 
2/3 of height. Flue" area with rectangular lining should be 1/10 
of height times width, or 1/12 when a circular lining is used 



12 



YOUR HOME 
OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 




THE hearth has been the time-honored center of 
the home, not only because fireplaces are cheerful 
and attractive to look at, but also because they serve 
a very useful purpose, even in these days of auto- 
matic heating. Appearance of your fireplace can be 
anything your fancy dictates, for burned clay prod- 
ucts offer a wide variety of colors and textures from 
which to choose. Construction should follow proven 
rules or fireplaces may smoke or burn fuel unevenly. 

Make the opening large enough for the size of the 
room. The 2 -0 width is only for very small rooms ; an 
average of B'-G" is a practical width for most uses. 
Height and depth should be proportionate to width 
as indicated in the accompanying sketch. Sides and 
back should slope so that heat will be deflected into 
the room. Both should slope toward the front of the 
fireplace — the "throat" where the damper is installed. 

A particularly important part of fireplace construc- 
tion is the smoke chamber above the throat in which 
smoke collects while the chimney is warming. This 
should slope up evenly toward the center or the fire 
may not burn evenly. The "smoke shelf" behind the 
throat should slope or be curved upward also or smoke 
eddies in the chimney may puff out into the room. 
Build chimneys at least two feet above the ridge line 
of your house to assure good draft; line them with 
burned clay flues proportioned to fireplace size. 

A well-built fireplace will reflect a great deal of 
heat. To make it even more efficient you can install a 
heat-saving device, a sort of fireplace lining built with 
metal flues. Cold air is drawn into it at the floor level, 
warmed and then discharged through grilles near the 
fireplace opening. Thus a continuous circulating heat- 
ing system is set up which uses only formerly wasted 
heat and in no way detracts from the appearance or 
operation of the fireplace. 




Above, a colonial interior, cheerful and simple as the old 
homes were, has a fireplace built of big paving brick to 
lend an appropriate air of solidity to the room. At left, a 
room of great proportions would dwarf an ordinary mantel, 
so the designer has featured this massive brick chimney 





^MTE all know the solid comfort and worth of a 
■ ■ good fireplace like those shown above and 
lielow. More than any other feature in the house, it 
seems to spell "home". And now the outdoor fireplace 
is becoming popular. As a place to gather on cool 
spring or autumn evenings, as the scene of im- 
promptu picnics, or for just the charm of an open 
fire out of doors, a fireplace on the porch, or even 
in a corner of the garden, is a great addition to any 
home. And, properly built of burned clay masonry, 
such a fireplace is a permanent and inexpensive 
source of enjoyment for the whole family 



GOOD 



Make your chimney tall enough. If the chimney is 
lower than the ridge of the roof, it may get in the 
way of down drafts of air which will cause the fire- 
place to smoke. If, when the chimney is built higher 
than the ridge, its proportions seem small, a burned 
clay chimney pot will help to give needed height 




13 



YOUR HOME 
OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 




And In Your Gar 



YOUR HOME 
OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 



THE modern home-builder wisely gives as much 
attention to the development of the grounds 
around his house as he does to the house itself. Not 
only does a good house deserve an attractive setting; 
actually, the comfort and livability of the home is 
greatly increased by the provision of a terrace, a 
porch, a flower-bordered lawn — places which, in 
summer weather, become the outdoor living rooms of 
the home. 

Consider, then, the charm of a garden wall of mel- 
lowed brick, patterned with the shadows of bright 
flowering plants. Think of the cool comfort of a simple 
terrace, paved with brick or tile, tree-shaded on warm 
summer afternoons and evenings. The garage wall, 
built of tile or brick and nicely designed as to bond 
and texture, harmonizes with lawn or garden. Brick 
walks, for entrance or in the garden, are as attractive 
as they are permanent; and for the country home, brick 
gate posts add a final finish to the driveway. 

All these things can be built economically — the 
garden walls and walks, the terraces and porches, the 
outdoor fireplace and all the similar touches which help 
the appearance of the landscaping and add to the 
charm of your home. 

Burned clay products are appropriate not only for 
their beauty, not only because their harmonious col- 




ors are found in the finest gardens of the world, but 
also because they are prudently economical to use. 
Any form of well-burned clay will stand the winter 
frosts and snows, the summer heat; it will need no 
maintenance, exact no added expense. It will never 
grow old or need to be replaced. And, perhaps best 
of all, it will become a little more mellow and beau- 
tiful every year. This is something to consider, both 
in the garden and in the house; many materials look 
fine when they are new ; most grow shabby with age. 
But brick and tile increase in beauty and become more 
valuable as time goes by. 




17*011 serpentine walls, for 
• sturdy garden terraces, even 
for swimming pools, burned clay 
products are ideal materials to 
use. As they grow older, ex- 
posure mellows them and en- 
hances their attractiveness. They 
blend perfectly with any sort of 
garden scheme and have long 
been a favorite with architects 
and landscape architects 




15 



The charm of a well-developed garden is illustrated in the 

circular well and paving above. And the adaptability of 

burned clay construction is too obvious to need comment in 

the picture of the attractive stair at the left 



YOUR HOME 
OF BURNED 
CLAY MASONRY 



To Help You Plan a>» Build 




A Home of Your Own 



ni'V) bring your dream down to earth, to learn facts and figures regard- 
ing the actual planning and building of your home, you probably 
need the help of experts, of men experienced in all phases of building. 
This help is easily available to you, for in your own community are men 
whose lives and training are devoted to the art and business of building. 
These are the architect, the building contractor, the building materials 
dealer and the local lending agency. Tell them your needs, the limita- 
tions of your budget, your ideas regarding the use of burned clay prod- 
ucts in the planning and design of the house you want to build. Each 
will give you full cooperation in achieving your desire for a well-built 
home of your own. 



PLANNING .YOUR HOME will be simplified if 
you show your architect or builder what you have in 
mind. To help 3^011 make this clear, plates of a num- 
ber of home designs have been inserted in the en- 
velope on the back cover of this book. 

Each one represents a successful, well-planned, 
well-built house of moderate cost. Each can be eco- 
nomically built of clay products to give the utmost 
of comfort, fire-safety and permanence for the money 
you will spend. Among them you may find exactly the 
home you want. Or you may find one that will suit 
your needs and purse only after some adjustment has 
been made in the plan or design. 

In any case, take your selection to your architect or 
builder. The photograph and drawings on the plate 
will give him the information he needs to make revi- 
sions or to get preliminary cost figures. From these 
plates also, working drawings can easily be developed. 
These are necessary before your house can be 
financed and built. 

HOME OWNERSHIP will prove a sound invest- 
ment from ever} T point of view as well as a vast source 
of contentment if you are careful to consider a few 
points before you start to build. 

First, be sure the neighborhood is one in which you 
and your family will enjoy living — not only now, but 
years hence. Get to know the people in it and decide 
for yourself whether they can be your friends and the 
playmates of your children. Be sure also about fire 



and police protection, educational facilities and 
transportation. 

Second, plan a house in harmony with those in 
your chosen neighborhood. Poor design in a good 
neighborhood depreciates all property values; and a 
costly, ostentatious house usually shows a financial 
loss when an emergency requires selling it. Choose 
a lot for good drainage and soil, with a pleasant out- 
look and plenty of sunlight and play space. 

Finally, build sturdily for the future. A home con- 
structed with burned clay products has a first cost 
very little more than one of less permanent character. 
And the slight additional cost is saved many times 
over through reduced insurance, maintenance and de- 
preciation expense. Remember, the cost of owning a 
home involves more than the first construction cost. 
Through the years, a home properly built with burned 
clay products will cost you less to own and enjoj 7 than 
any other type of less permanent construction. 

BUILDING YOUR HOME requires skill and 
knowledge gained from long practical experience. 
Therefore choose your architect carefully for his 
proven ability to use burned clay products to the 
best advantage. And be sure that your builder, too, 
has behind him a record of honest masonry construc- 
tion, built with the craftman's understanding of the 
beauty, economy, permanency and vast adaptability 
of burned clay in all its many types, colors, shapes 
and surface textures. 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE 



(me.) 



1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



Printed in U.S.A. 



THREE SMALL HOMES 

OF BURNED CLAY MASONRY 




meeting requirements for 

F. H. A. Insured Financim 



HROUGHOUT the 
United States are hun- 
dreds of thousands of 
mmii£Eu people who — like yourself — 
want to live in a home they 
can call their own. Like you. 
they want to build or buy a small house. But without ex- 
ception they want substantial construction, good planning 
and attractive design together with a plan for payment 
that makes financing easy even from carefully budgeted 
incomes. 

To these thousands of families, home values must be high 
and home costs low. Houses, including land and all inci- 
dental expenses, must cost from $2,500 to $4,500 so that 
monthly payments covering everything can he made like 
rent and not exceed a range from $25 to $35 each month. 

These facts were made plain in a nation-wide survey 
recently conducted by the Federal Housing Administra- 
tion. So obviously important were they that F.H.A. under- 
took a detailed study of principles underlying the 
planning and construction of economical, comfortable 
and efficiently-planned small houses. 

Results of this study, contained in F.H.A. Bulletin No. 
4, "Principles of Planning Small Houses," proved that 
good small houses could be built within the desired cost 
range. And to thousands of families this was indeed 
welcome news. 

F.H.A. has said — "Such houses can be built — and we 
will insure their liberal financing in any approved locality 
in the United States!" 

Here, truly, is a lusty challenge to the building industry ! 
It has been accepted! In this little book the Structural 
Clay Products Institute shows you how these small homes 
can be built. Read for yourself how exterior walls and 
foundations of brick, clay tile or both, can give your own 
small home sturdy economical construction, safety from 
fire and a permanent beauty. 

GOOD PLANNING — WITH BEAUTY 

The three small house designs that follow were de- 
veloped by architects and engineers of the Structural Clay 
Products Institute after investigation of studies made by 
F.H.A. They embody all F.H.A. principles of small house 



planning and differ only in minor architectural details 
from the excellent designs suggested in F.H.A.'s Bulletin 
No. 4. 

Floor plans of each little house can be adapted to fit 
conditions of your site and requirements of your family 
life. For economy each can be constructed without a base- 
ment. But all can contain more living space at slight extra 
expense if a basement is used. Fresh air circulates freely 
through every room and every inch of floor space is put 
to work for comfortable and convenient living. 

Exteriors will be always attractive. Walls will cost 
nothing to maintain because they are constructed of 
burned clay products. You may build your home of brick 
and enjoy the beauty of permanently good design that is 
inherently a characteristic of this age-old product. Or you 
may use clay tile to gain an unusual effect of scale and 
texture in your walls. Again, you may combine brick and 
tile to make a solid, permanent wall. Either product is 
easily available to you anywhere. You need only consult 
your local building material dealer for full information 
on colors, textures, patterns and comparative prices. 

LET F.H.A. SPEAK 

These designs for brick and clay tile houses were sub- 
mitted to F.H.A. Engineers to make certain that each 
would meet requirements for F.H.A. Insured Financing. 
Let F.H.A. speak! 

"These homes meet the F.H.A. standards of livability 
and durability. Their low cost is due to the clever use of 
space and the proper materials which make for economy. 

"Homes like these may be paid for in 15 to 20 years on 
the F.H.A. Plan at the rate of from $22 to $35 a month. 
Each is skilfully planned for living comfort, for easy 
housekeeping and for health. Any reliable architect can 
plan his own version of these basic designs according to 
your individual family requirements and pocketbook." 

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUILD 

A home such as one of these Structural Clay Products 
Institute suggestions can be yours. Buying or building 
today is easily arranged through the F.H.A. Insured 
Financing Plan which, briefly, works this way: 

First select the home you want, (Continued on last page) 



I 

r ■-'■ . f 




S— I 




*«* MM 





rrrrrrr 

irt±$t 
u ninny 

mi 













_E_A fVEM»J£.TT- 



rill l V 



. - - - ■ 



--* 



25-4 



Jjr^TTCTj 1 T> Here is proof that good design at low cost 
can result when fine materials are used to 
build from the compact and convenient floor plan of this small 
house. The plans show possibilities of saving still further money by 
eliminating a basement and installing heating equipment in a small 
utility room near the rear entrance off the kitchen. The basement, 
when constructed under the whole house, could contain a recreation 
room lined with glazed brick or tile and attractively paved with brick. 

Construction of this little house could be with solid brick Avails or 
with walls of brick backed up with hollow clay tile as shown in the 
sections on the opposite page. Foundations could be of either hollow 
tile or brick. Use of burned clay products for exterior walls give 
home owners a wide choice of color, tex- 
ture and pattern. Consult your local mate- fc&lz 

rial dealer for full information on the _ 

many varieties of clay products that are 5' 

available. 

Cost of this house may vary widely in 
various sections of the country. Without 
land, service charges or expenses of land- 
scaping, etc., the cost should average 
approximately $3,025 to §3,400. Omission 
of the basement should save about $500. 
Depending on the size of your down pay- 
ment and the terms of your mortgage, 
purchase payments under the F.H.A. In- 
sured Financing Plan should average 
about $25 to $27 per month. 





The small houses shown in this booklet 
conform to suggestions made in F.H.A. 
Technical Bulletin No. 4 and all have 
been fully approved for F.H.A. Insured 
Financing. Approximate costs are based 
upon F.H.A. figures for frame construc- 
tion with a reasonable allowance added for 
contractor's profit and the use of burned 
clay products in walls and foundations. 



■ 



1 



2'* 6" &zf£ers. 



maso/uif 
trail 





Brick step 

jfro2it £leva£io2i 



floor 




Wall Sec£zo2is 



Finished, grade 

c Rea2^ Elevation 



fyrapliic Scales 

ELEVATIONS 




fuuseied grade. 

c Hiqht Side Elevation 



Bride slep — 



Left Side £levatio2i 



j»?Mf> 









XAPE-NNE 




JJOUSE T~) This is a small two-story home of which anyone can be justly proud. 
Like "House B" it can be built with or without a basement, according to 
your site conditions, your family requirements and your pocketbook. . . . Construction may be 
of either solid brick or brick with clay tile backing with foundations of brick or clay tile as 
indicated on the opposite page. The house is designed for an all brick exterior although variations 
such as that illustrated above are possible on the entrance side. . . . Cost, exclusive of the garage, 
should average approximately $3,100 to $3,500, not including land, service charges, or expenses 
of landscaping, etc. Omission of basement should save about $400. A one-car garage as shown 
should cost between $250 and $400. Payments under the F.H.A. Insured Financing Plan should 
be about S26 to $29 per month. These figures may vary widely depending upon job conditions, 
locality and the terms of your mortgage. 



fcaj£ 5' 



BED RM 



Oos. 



BED RM 

H'-f x l2'-2" 



f W BATH " H LL 

7-3*7-IO M f f 


















( 


i iy l y / \\ 





























Clos 



Oos 



J3U 



Cement Cap 



fAeaihuif 




Wall Section 



finished fra.de 

'Hear £levatio2i 



Wall Section 



Roof pitch 

7 Write, fo'run 




Cemenl Czp 



Meial f Lulling .. 



£eft Side 
£levatio2i 



llight Side 
£levalio2i 



Sraphic Scales 

ELEVATIONS 



O 
DETAILS 



10 



JYood 

I 



finished grade 




/* *& J . 



=3 i 



1 





XJ/^TT^'p , "p Clever planning has included three generous bedrooms, 
±±\-P ^ ^-^ -^ ample closet space and an unusually large living room 
in this two-story small home. Like the foregoing houses, this one may be built 
without a basement if a dining room is not a requirement of your family life 
or if conditions of your lot make excavation and under-surface construction 
expensive. . . . Construction is possible with walls of solid brick or with ex- 
teriors of brick backed with clay tile as shown in the sections on the opposite 
page. Foundations may be either brick or hollow tile. Basement walls can be 
faced with glazed brick or tile as shown in the solid masonry section. 

Cost, without land, service 
charges or landscaping, etc., 
should average approximately 
$3,500 to $4,100. Omission of 
a basement might lower this 
figure about §400. These fig- 
ures, however, may vary widely 
depending upon locality and 
job conditions. Financing pay- 
ments under the F.H.A. In- 
sured Financing Plan should 
amount to about $32 to 835 per 
month depending upon the 
amount of your down payment 
and terms of your mortgage. 



Scale 5' 



10' 





x'-p ^^^H 

< "* r ii £& 

CO ir< | ; J 

d HALL 
, , * 


r BED RM 
r 8 : 6"*9'-i!" 


















1 J 

Clos 


BED RM I 

9'- ll"x 12'- 2" 










1 Oos 




j BED RM 

9-2"x9"-8" 





fflUlglfS 

fhealkuzg- 

Wood 
gutter 




2nd 'jpd 

JLcor tt°or 



*- Ceiling 

_kcmforc 
ed tioUc,. 
k 7iLelwlel floor 



_k£Lnforc- , , 

ed Hollow M 



Bond 
every— 
■4 courses E 



drade- 



12" Brick or 

Hollow TUe. 

foiuidcd'ri 



HEAD 



JAMB 



SILL 




Fuushed grade 

"jliqlit Side Elevation 



L Pursier 
L- Furrutg 



2~*8jois, 




: 



Wall Section 




Left Side Elevation 




fhtnglt 

fhealhayg &? 

Wood 
Ciuiler 



Top of- 
masowu 
wail 7 



8 clay 
masonry 

Furring '_ 




HEAD 



JAMB 




12" Brick 
or Ho Hon' 

r TUe , 
fcimdaln 



^. 



Bruk 
, floor 



Wall Section 



Geme.nl 6an 



$raphic Scales 

ELEVATIONS 

^—- — — — — — — ' 

5' O 5' 

DETAILS 
12" O 2 



-dlefcd /laskuuy .3 



BtuZi-m 
gutter 



Flush boards 
or fiucco 

Wood 
Cornice 



L llecu^ 



= Elevation 



Efront 
Elevation 




fLnishtd- grajic 



^-Jfrick flepi^ 'Wood doom-ay 



BUILD WITH BURNED CLAY MASONRY 

FOR ECONOMY .... FOR PERMANENCE .... FOR BEAUTY 



consult with your architect, builder, dealer or realtor and 
get a rough estimate of costs. Then take your plans to any 
bank or lending institution approved by F.H.A. Outline 
your situation frankly — what your expenses and your 
income are and what you can afford as down payment. 

When your application is approved, you will be granted 
a mortgage payable in monthly in- 
stallments figured according to your 
income over a convenient period of 
years. These payments, similar to rent, 
take care of all charges such as taxes, 
interest and insurance and at the same 
time reduce the amount borrowed. At 
the end of your payment period, your 
home is completely clear of debt and 
you are forever free of refinancing 
worries. 

For complete information consult 
your local F.H.A. office. To find it. 
write to Federal Housing Administra- 
tion, Washington. D. C, or to the 
office of the Structural Clay Products 
Institute. 

BURNED CLAY 
CONSTRUCTION 

Because construction with burned 
clay products gives your home such 
far-reaching value, each little house 
in this booklet has been designed for 
use of any of the many types of brick 
or clay tile. 





Walls built of these materials are forever sturdy and 
gain in mellow attractiveness throughout the years. They 
are completely fire-safe and give you practical low-cost 
protection against winter storms and summer sun. And 
because a properly built wall of burned clay products 
never needs costly repairs, it imparts a solid economy to 
small house construction that every 
home owner should insist upon. 

Small houses can be built with 
exterior walls of solid brick, with 
brick exteriors backed with hollow 
tile, or with glazed face tile backed 
with clay tile as indicated by the left- 
hand drawing on this page. Brick can 
also be used as an attractive and fire- 
safe veneer over steel framing or 
wood construction as suggested in the 
right-hand sketch. 

Burned clay products may also be 
used for small house foundations, for 
basement and garage floors, for at- 
tractive glazed walls in basement 
playrooms or laundries and in an 
endless variety of ways to develop a 
pleasant garden setting for your 
small home. 

Remember that all these uses and 
the economies that they suggest for 
small homes apply directly to the de- 
sign and construction of larger houses 
— which, by the way, can also be built 
or bought under the F.H.A. Insured 
Financing Plan. Homes from $5,000 
to 925,000 can be built to incorporate 
the same principles of planning and 
sound financing. For all houses, 
burned clay products are economical 
and adaptable. 

Full information regarding any of 
the homes shown here, including de- 
sirable types of plumbing, heating 
and electrical equipment for use in 
their construction is freely available 
to you. Simply write to the Federal 
Housing Administration, Washington. 
D. C. or to the Structural Clay Prod- 
ucts Institute at the address below. 



More than 70,000 visitors 
examined and approved 
this F.H.A. Demonstra- 
tion House B designed by 
the Structural Clay Prod- 
ucts Institute, at the 
North American Home 
Show held in Madison 
Square Garden, New 
York, during May, 1937. 
Above, wall sections show 
two ways in which burned 
clay products may be 
used to build small 
houses in addition to 
those illustrated in the 
foregoing drawings. 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE 

INC. 
1427 EYE STREET, N. W., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



A-l-G 

ONE STORY NO 
BASEMENT; 2 BED- 
ROOMS 




FIRST 
FLOOR 



In this one-story house are con- 
tained all the essentials and many of 
the luxuries of modern living. It is 
designed to be built around a garden 
and includes both a porch and a ter- 
race, either one of which may be con- 
veniently served from the kitchen, if 
the owner wishes to dine outside. In 
addition to the usual dining room, liv- 
ing room, garage and service and 
sleeping quarters, there is a den with 
a spacious bay window, book cases and 
closet space. This room is so located 
that it might easily be used as an addi- 
tional bedroom. There is also a small 
yet adequate breakfast room. 

The architect is H. Roy Kelley. 
Many types of structural clay prod- 
ucts are suitable for the construction 
of tli is house. The total volume is 
approximately 21,500 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS 

INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 Eye Street, N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 




PORCH 

7-4"* 27-6" 






A-l-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



inq 




Finished grade / 



Brick porch 



ironi olevaiicm 




-3r/cL platform 

Right Side Slevaiion 




Finished grade ' 



~&nck Retrace 

LeU Side S leva f ion 




ONE-AND-A-HALF 
STORY AND BASE- 
MENT/2 BEDROOMS 



SECOND FLOOR 





This one and one-half story house, planned for a family requiring 
only two bedrooms, contains such luxuries as a sizeable breakfast 
room lighted by a bay window and a large dressing closet opening 
off the master bedroom. There is a clothes chute starting from the 
linen closet on the second floor with an opening from the closet of 
the bedroom and discharging into a clothes hamper in the basement. 
There is ample space in the basement for development of a future 
game room. 

T. L. Johnson and Dale It. Johnson are the architects. The inter- 
esting brick cornice and window heads illustrate some of the many 
possibilities for designing architectural details in brick. These 
might very easily be combined with structural clay tile for exterior 
wall facings. For details, see the sections on the reverse of this 
sheet. The volume totals approximately 23,900 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D.C. 



FIRST FLOOR 



BASEMENT 



Scale 




A-2 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



c£b 




%all Section 




Mefoi Leaders Brick Steps J Finished Grade , 

Troni Slevailon 



c^b 





Brick Steps Finished Grade Brick Terrace 4 Steps Picket Fence 

Rear Slevailon 
graphic Scales 




II Reinforced 
\ Tile or 
\Brichfloor 

Damp- Ek"" 
proofing [% 

rode-, * 



%all Section 




"•Brick Ter 



jSeft Side Sieve tio 



n 



5rick Steps Finished Graded Brick Sieps 

Right Side Sieve Hon 



A-3-G 



TWO STORY AND 
BASEMENT; 3 BED- 
ROOMS 




SECOND FLOOR 




Hall space — ordinarily unuscable for living purposes — 
is here eliminated as far as is practically possible with 
the result that in this small house, rooms are unusually 
large. There is an ample closet opening off the entrance 
vestibule on the first floor. The second floor bath contains 
both a tub and a shower. Over the attached garage there 
is space for a future bathroom adjoining the master 
bedroom. The basement is roomy enough to permit inclu- 
sion of a future recreation room. 

The house was designed and built by Mott Brothers. 
Its simple exterior will lend itself admirably to the use 
of structural clay tile or other forms of brick than the 
one originally used. The volume totals approximately 
22,300 cu. ft. ' 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



FIRST FLOOR 

li : o"- 




5' O lo' 

BASEMENT 



! i 



IW 



o 



A-3-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Inc. 



ELEVATIONS 




graphic Scales 



DETAILS 



12" 



Linftl 



4'RaUom 
Tile 



4' Brick 



Steel 
Lint*! 




forced 
Hollow 



loitt 
ehor 




HEAD 



JAMB 



Bond 
every 5i* 
Course ~~ 

Damp- 
proofing m 

Grade* 





Rear Slevalion 



%qII Secii 



ons 




drich Step ■> t Finished Grade 

Cefi Side Slevaiton 




Right Side £ leva Hon 




TWO STORY AND 
BASEMENT; 2 BED- 
ROOMS 




The monotony of the usual small house exterior is here 
relieved by a projecting living room in the front and a 
two-ear garage in the rear. The end of the living room 
contains bookcases and a window seat. There is a con- 
venient firewood closet beside the fireplace. A telephone 
niche is incorporated in the wall at the entrance to the 
living room. Each of the second floor bedrooms has its 
own bathroom and two closets. 

The house was designed and built by Mott Brothers. 
Materials appropriate for use in the exterior walls and 
floors include red, buff or light gray brick or other forms 
of structural clay products. The volume totals approx- 
imately 30,400 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



SECOND FLOOR 




BASEMENT 

P 




FIRST FLOOR 




B-l-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, 

1427 EYE STREET, N.W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



IllC. 




%all Seciions 



Finished Grade 7 

Led Side Slevation 




TWO STORY; NO 
BASEMENT; 3 BED- 
ROOMS 





I'i I 



■Mi • . ■ 

ii !■! I! 



mmbmMb:' 




This two-story house with a central hall has 
on the first floor a living room, dining room, 
kitchen, large breakfast room and a den large 
enough to be used as an additional bedroom. 
The house was originally built with a complete 
batli opening from the den. This detail, of 
course, can be easily modified. If a lavatory 
rather than a bathroom is desired, the space 
now used for a shower can be converted into 
an additional hall closet. "While no basement 
was originally included, it would be a simple 
matter to provide access to one through part 
of the space now used as closets and breakfast 
room. On the second floor the master bedroom 
has a private bath and a small dressing room. 
The other two bedrooms have ample closet space 
and use a common bath. 

The architect is C. H. Page. Materials suit- 
able for constructing the exterior walls and the 
floors include various forms of structural clay 
products, as indicated in the alternate sections 
on the reverse of this sheet. The volume totals 
approximately 29,800 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C 



SECOND 
FLOOR 



FIRST 
FLOOR 




i — a-- 



F 



_ PORCH 




i | i 



C-l 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



graphic Scales 



ELEVATIONS 




Kear SlevaUon 



%a\\ Sections 




TWO STORY AND 

BASEMENT; 3 BED. 

ROOMS 




Here is a straightforward house with all the virtues of 
a simple convenient plan as well as a gracious exterior. 
The central hall gives access to all rooms on the first and 
second floor. Two coat closets, a powder room and lava- 
tory, and a kitchen planned for efficiency are first floor 
features worthy of notice. The second floor bath contains 
both a tub and a shower. "Wall space in all rooms lias been 
planned to permit a great variety of furniture placements 
— enough to suit every housewife. 

Mott Brothers designed and built the house. Alternate 
types of wall and floor construction are shown in the 
details on the reverse of this sheet. The volume totals 
approximately 20,800 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



Left above, BASEMENT; lower left, FIRST FLOOR 
Below, SECOND FLOOR 




D-l-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C 



State roof-} 



Roof . 

Sheathing /£&' \\d 





SUel 
Lmltl 



K'a/I Tile 

laid on 
end or 
side 



foinforctd 
Hollow 

.Tile 
Unlet 



tvtru S'> LJki-lTrleor 
Count — *U2S^ Pi trick floor 
Damp- Ml,|, ^^ grs= 
proofing Ci> 




%all 

Section 




Finished orada 



^-Unci Porch 

ironi Elevation 




Finished erode -^ — brick terrace 

Rear Elevation 



Qraphic 
Scales 




JAMB 



Damp- 
prooim 



S"or /2" 
Otpending 
on Cod* 
$ Soil-" 
(bndiliortf 





Section 




£eft Side elevation 



Finished grade ^ 

Right Side Slevalion 



D-2-G 

TWO STORY AND 
BASEMENT; 3 BED- 
ROOMS 




BASEMENT 




The "center hall" plan of this house provides a lavatory, coat 
closet and powder room on the first floor. On the second floor, 
the hall is very short and gives access to three bedrooms and a 
hath containing a shower as well as a tub and a linen closet. 
All bedrooms have ample closet space as well as sufficient wall 
space for twin or double beds. 

The house was designed and built by Mott Brothers. Various 
types of structural clay products, as indicated by the sections 
on the reverse of this sheet, may be used in constructing the 
walls and floors. The volume totals approximately 26,700 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



FIRST FLOOR 



SECOND FLOOR 




D-2-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Thll 

section 



Wood sitfirti 



f_Ceihnq 




Finished qrade 



brick Porch J 

Rear Slevafion 
Qraphic Scales 



ELEVATIONS 



DETAILS 




^fiylReinfarced 
%JV:>: iS Tile or 

Damp- 

Prooflng^ 

Grade \ 




Phil 

Section 




Finished grade 



Heft Side Elevation 



Right Side elevation 



D-3-G 

TWO STORY AND 
BASEMENT; 3 BED- 
ROOMS 




rtnrurr TgiSi 



FIRST FLOOR 




SECOND 
FLOOR 




BASEMENT 




In this first floor plan are contained a maid's room and 
bathj the laundry and a two-car garage in addition to the 
kitchen, living room and dining room. On the second floor, 
the master bedroom has a large dressing closet and a 
private bath. The other two bedrooms are served by a 
bath with a tub and a shower. Each bedroom has a large 
closet. The central stairs are so planned that hall space 
is reduced to a minimum. 

The house was designed and built by Mott Brothers. 
Various types of structural clay products, as indicated 
on the reverse of this sheet, are suitable for exterior walls 
and floors. The volume totals approximately 28,500 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



D-3-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 




8"at!2- 
Dtptnding 
on Code 
(. So,!- 
Condi hon 



%a1l Section 



graphic Scales 

ELEVATIONS 



%all Section 



Ceiling 




brick Porch 



Heft Side elevation 



Finished Grade S 

Right Side Elevation 



D-4-G 

TWO STORY AND 
BASEMENT; 3 BED- 
ROOMS 




SECOND FLOOR 




If you own a sloping lot, do not think it will be expensive to build a mod- 
ern and convenient home. Here is an example in which all three floors are 
used for living quarters. The basement dining room and porch open directly 
upon the garden at the rear and below street level. Up half a story is the living 
room. From the first floor hall the master bedroom opens with its bath, closets 
and dressing room. On the second floor are two more bedrooms and a bath. 

The architect is O. L. Gowman. Any type of burned clay masonry which is 
sufficiently formal in character may be used on the exterior. Walls, of course, 
and particularly the foundation walls should preferably be of solid clay masonry. 
The total volume is approximately 26,200 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



FIRST FLOOR 



BASEMENT 



35-o" 



lo'-6' 





D-4-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Sheathing 




4-Hotlon 
Tile laid \ 
on end 
or side 




oACcdi \ :'-,. -\Ondtr 
4 Soil — { 

Condition [<'■.; 



%all Seciion 





Finished erode ' 



Sheathing 





IS, 



16' or ?o' 

0tpmimgn 

on Codt V 
I Soil — ■ f 
Conditions l 



Bf/c/l 
Or Tilt 

Floor 
on Sand 



Rear Slevaiion 



skill Seciion 




Finished yrade •/ 

jSefi Side Slevaiion 



Righi Side Slevaiion 




TWO STORY AND 
BASEMENT; 3 BED- 
ROOMS 






O 



BASEMENT 



FIRST FLOOR 




The first floor of this commodious house contains, in addition 
to a large living room and dining room, a first floor lavatory 
witli an adjoining powder room, a music room or enclosed porch 
and two large-sized closets in the hall. The stair hall is so ar- 
ranged that persons using the stairs do not intrude upon the 
attention of family or guests in the living and dining rooms. The 
kitchen and pantry are well-planned from the modern "step- 
saving" viewpoint. There is ample room in the basement for 
development of future game rooms. On the second floor eacli of 
the three bedrooms has a large closet and the master bedroom 
lias a private bath. An additional bathroom serves the other two 
bedrooms and an adequate linen closet is provided. 

The house was designed by Merrill H. Lincoln, Architect, and 
built by Louis Slocum, Contractor. As built, the walls are of solid 
brick with facing brick selected for slightly rough texture. These 
specifications may readily be varied as to colors or textures or 
to use of structural clay tile as indicated in the alternate sections 
on the reverse. The total volume is approximately 34,800 cu, ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



SECOND FLOOR 




D-5 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 




Finished Grade 



jCeff Side Slevaiion 



Right Side Slevaiion 




Finished Grade 



Rear olevaiion 




TWO STORY AND 

BASEMENT; 3 BED- 

ROOMS 





Originally developed for a farm, these plans are equally suitable for use 
in any residential location with but slight adaptations. Farm kitchens, for 
instance, are ordinarily larger than those in suburban homes. The right end 
of the kitchen might very well be developed as a breakfast room. The second 
floor plan with its small hall permits inclusion of the greatest number of 
bedrooms within minimum limits. 

The designers are R. B. and AV. J. Goodwin. As the house was originally 
built, foundations were constructed of load-bearing tile; first floor of pre- 
cast tile beams and the exterior walls of brick backed up with structural tile. 
Alternate sections on the reverse indicate bow these specifications might be 
varied. The volume totals approximately 20,100 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C, 



SCALE 




D-6 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C 




4" Hollow 
Tile 



4" Brick 



Sfee/ 
Lintel 



Piatt 
Anchor 

HEAD 





Reinforced 
Hollow 
Tile 
Until 

HEAD 



SILL 



Damp- 
proofing. 

Grade -j 



1*L 



~^7 





JAM8 




%a\\ Seciions 




Finished arade^ ^-Br/'ci. steps 

Jroni Slevaiion 






Metal 




Finished orade ~^ 

Rear Slevaiion 




J2efi Side Slevaiion 



Finished orade S 

Righi Side Slevaiion 



D-7-G 

TWO STORY AND 

BASEMENT; 3 BED 

ROOMS 




SECOND FLOOR 




Here is a house very nearly square in plan — the most eco- 
nomical shape to build. The porch and garage together with 
the well designed exterior relieve its severity. The octagonal 
entrance hall, semi-circular stair, telephone niche in the 
lower hall, first floor lavatory and powder room ae delightful 
details. A modern kitchen in which a busy housewife may so 
plan her work that cooking does not occupy every minute is 
nearly the ultimate in efficiency. 

The designers and builders are Mott Brothers. Various 
types of structural clay products, as indicated by the sections 
on the reverse of this sheet, may be used in constructing the 
walls and floors. The volume totals approximately 24>000 
cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



FIRST FLOOR 



BASEMENT 





D-7-G 



STRUCTURAL CXAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



5lote roof 




Finished qrade s 



Rear Slevalion 



%a\\ Secilons 




Meial flashin 



Finished graded "^-Brick porch 

JZeii Side Sieved ion 




Brick step- 

Kighi Side Slevaiion 




TWO STORY AND 
BASEMENT; 3 BED- 
ROOMS 




This first floor plan lias, in addition to the dining room and 
living room, a large enclosed sun room or porch and a dining 
alcove. The hall is entered through a vestibule and contains a 
sizeable overclothing closet. The kitchen refrigerator may be 
placed in the rear entry. On the second floor there are three 
bedrooms, a bath and a sewing room alcove off the end of the hall. 

The architects are Brown & von Beren. Many types of struc- 
tural clay products are suitable for use in constructing the walls 
and floors. The volume totals approximately 27,500 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



SECOND FLOOR 




BASEMENT 



FIRST FLOOR 





D-9 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Roof 
Sheolhm, 




Steel 
Lintel 



rYall Tile 
mat/ be 
laid on 
end or 
side 





Finished Grad, 



iron 



WJnefr Steps 

t elevation 



graphic 
Scales 




%all Section 



Finis h ed Grade ) 

Rear Elevation 



Sheathing 
Quite 



"z>~*-'. 



Top of 



6'5rick I 
or Tile 



Joist 
ichor 



nforced 



Damp- 
proofing v 

Grade , 

a'w 12- 

Depending ] 
on Code 
$ Soil ~*A 
Condition t 



/fall Section 




jCefl Side Slevaiion 



Right Side Slevation 




TWO STORY AND 
BASEMENT; 3 BED- 
ROOMS 




SECOND FLOOR 




On the first floor of this house are living room, dining room, 
kitchen, breakfast room, lavatory and enclosed porch, all of which 
are of convenient size. A coat closet opens from the vestibule. On 
the second floor, the master bedroom has a large dressing closet 
and from the hall open two linen closets. 

The architects are Davis & Wilson. As originally constructed, 
the house was as nearly fireproof as modern methods of building 
permit. Walls are of brick and clay tile with a hollow space which 
is used for air conditioning. Floors are of reinforced hollow tile 
and windows of steel sash witli tile trim. Light buff or gray brick 
are entirely suitable for the exterior facings. The volume totals 
approximately 30,000 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



FIRST FLOOR 




BASEMENT 




11-10 



STRUCTURAL CUAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C 




%all Seel ion 



Rear S leva t ion 
\jraphic 



finished Qrqde • 



%a\\ Section 




fin/shed Grade * 

JZeii Side Slevation 



&rick Stept 

Right Side Slevation 



D-U-G 

TWO STORY AND 
BASEMENT; 3 BED- 
ROOMS 




FIRST FLOOR 



SECOND FLOOR 




□ 

BATH 

6V8' 

o 



a~ 

\\~ 

ZZ ~Z7~ 
D 



CL 



HALL 



BED ROOM 
io'-4"xio'-q" 











BED ROOM 
IO-7*vII'-8" 






* | CL | CL 






BED ROOM 
io-q"xi3'-6" 











This liouse, almost square in plan, contains on the first floor 
a dining room, living room and kitchen; and on the second floor 
three bedrooms and a bath. The basement contains a garage — a 
convenience made possible by the sloping site on which it was 
originally built. If built upon a level plot, the garage space 
might conveniently be used for a basement recreation room. 

The house was built by the United Realty Company. Various 
combinations of brick in red, buff or light gray colors or 
structural clay tile might be used in constructing the walls 
and floors. Volume totals approximately 20,350 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 



D-ll-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 




4' Hollow f 
Tile 



4'Eirick 



Brick 

Arch . 



Joist 
\Ancho 




Reinforced 
Holtou, 
. Tile 



JAMB 



Bond 
every 5*$ 
Course — 






B'ar 12- 
Defending 
on Code 
4 Soil — 
Condi/ions 



%all Section 



finished Grade 






Brick 
Arch 



HEAD 



JAMB 



Damp- 
proofing 

Grade-, ' 



mm 

V-filteinforceJ 



fln'cA Of 
Tile floor 
on Sand 
or Onder 
fill, 



%all Section 



tYood Step! 4 Aai/ing 

Rear Slevafion 



graphic 
Scales 

ELEVATIONS 

5' O 5' 

DETAILS 

12" O 2 




Left Side £levation 



Right Side Slevation 




TWO STORY AND 
BASEMENT; 4 BED- 
ROOMS 




The exterior details of this house and 
the methods of construction present an 
interesting study in the modern trend of 
architectural design. It cannot be truly 
said that any side of this house is the 
rear. The elevation facing the street must 
necessarily present an attractive appear- 
ance to passersby; the living quarters 
open directly on the garden at the rear; 
the main entrance is from the left side 
and even the kitchen entry is well- 
designed. The first floor contains a liv- 
ing room, hall, dining room, kitchen, 
pantry and garage; and the second floor 
four bedrooms and three baths with ample 
storage space. 

Carina Eaglesfield Mortimer is the ar- 
chitect. Many types of structural clay 
products are suitable for construction of 
the walls and floors. Volume totals ap- 
proximately 34,000 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS 

INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 Eye Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 



At the right, SECOND FLOOR; 

below, BASEMENT; lower right, 

FIRST FLOOR 







STRUCTURAL CLAY r PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 




f&a'hiit - 



JAMB 



Damp- 
proa/t'tid I ■'"'": 

Grade, 




%a\\ Sedion 




■ Brick Sfep Finished Grade J Brick Sfep) 

Iront Elevation 





5heafhing\ 
Gutter J^* 1? 



-■' 



Pla/e 
Anchot 



Sleet 
Unlet 



Wall Tile 
may be 




T 



Reinforced 
Hollow 

•Hr&llritet 



JAMB 



Bond 
every 5d* 
Course ~~ 



vfmc 




•b mn 

\ ay 



B m orl2 w < 
Depending 
on Code 
4 Soil — ' 
Conditions 




%all Section 



graphic Scales 

ELEVATIONS 



5«<:A S/<?/> Finished Grade! Brick Step} 

Rear Slevaiion 




ck S/ep 



JZeti Side Elevation 



Qrt'ck S/ep •> 



Finished Grade-- 



Right Side Elevation 




TWO STORY AND 

BASEMENT; 4 BED 

ROOMS 




BASEMENT 




In addition to the three bedrooms and two baths included in the 
second floor plan of this house, there is a maid's room and bath on 
the first floor. The maid's bath may also serve as a first floor lava- 
tory. The kitchen is planned in accordance with the latest recom- 
mendations of various kitchen institutes and the octagonal dining 
room with its large bay adds an interesting note without materially 
increasing the cost of the house. 

Mott Brothers designed and built this house. Alternate types of 
wall and floor construction are shown in the details on the reverse 
of this sheet. The volume totals approximately 30,200 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



FIRST FLOOR 



SECOND FLOOR 





F-2 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



5 late roaf~\ 




%all 



Sect 



ion 




Finished grade-*' ^~£>t-ick step 

Troni elevation 



Metal flashing 




Finished graded 

Rear Elevation 
Qraphic Scales 



ELEVATIONS 



DETAIL? 



r' 



3' Brick 
or Tile ~ 



. Plait 
Anchor 



Joisf 
Anchor 



HEAD 



JAMB 



\TiI« or 



4 Soil 
Condilu 



Stick or 
Jilt Floor 
i Sand 
or Cindtr 
Fill, 



%all 
Section 




Left Side Elevation 



Finished grade S 

Rignt Side Elevaiion 



F-3-G 

TWO STORY AND 

BASEMENT; 4 BED 

ROOMS 




SECOND FLOOR 




FIRST FLOOR 

— U'- 1" 




BASEMENT 




This long house with its low, sweeping roof lines 
appears to ramble comfortably over its site but, in 
actuality, all rooms are planned for convenient and 
comfortable living. For instance, there are three closets 
opening out of the entrance ball. The pantry contains 
space for a dining alcove, and the first floor lavatory 
is conveniently, but unobtrusively located under the 
landing of the main stairs. In addition, there are the 
convenience of a vestibule at the front entrance, an 
enclosed sun porch and a rear entry as well as a two- 
car garage. 

The architects are Mann & MacNeille. The charac- 
ter of the house demands the use of brick or clay tile 
of a comparatively rough texture. Volume totals ap- 
proximately 35,700 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Streef, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



F-3-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 




Fim sh ed Grade J 



Rear <5levaiio 



n 





floo/. 




On ffcr 5^ 


^J 


It 


jF 1 


Male 
'Anchor 


Jtiosettn/ 




HEAD 


B'Br.ck 

or Tilt - 


j fj 


Joisl 

Anchor 




V.^lril 




\ 










i j 


MEAO 



oZcedt 

( Soil 
Condition) 




graphic 
Scales 

ELEVATIONS 





Rot 


f_ 




Oulltr ^ 


eV / 


) , 




j^ 


li 






Plate 

Anchor 


/toll 






HEAD 


4'Ho.'So^ 

nit 






Joiil 


be fed 
on end 
or J;d> 










lo** 




Srtfsrctt 
Halt** 
- Tilt 


Sleel 

Imltl ~ 










on Code 
t So,! 




9fa// Sections 




Flunked Grades 



to 
Set-cant 's 
llm Floor 



Oarage 
Floor j | 



flight Side Elevation 




TT 7 -. /- j /3«cA> JYe/j ■ 

C Finished Grade 

£eft Side Slevaiion 




ONE-AND-A-HALF 
STORY; NO BASE- 
MENT; 5 BEDR'MS 




There is ample space for free and easy living in 
this house, yet considering its accommodations, the 
plan is compact. The basement is omitted from the 
original plans but might very easily be included, with 
access to it provided by a cellar stair directly under 
the present stair to the second floor. In such a case, 
one of the many linen or bedroom closets might be 
converted into a hall closet. Notice that all bedrooms 



but one have ventilation on at least two sides and that 
the bath which serves the first floor front bedroom 
can also serve as the first floor lavatory. 

The architect is Edwin C. Kreisle. While a light 
colored, comparatively smooth brick exterior was used 
in the house as originally built, the design is well 
adapted to other colors and types of structural clay 
products. The volume is approximately 3G,400 cu. ft. 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc 1427 Eye Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 



FIRST FLOOR 

21-6" 




SECOND FLOOR 



PORCH 
I o'- 6' if 24-2" 




G-l 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 




Wall Tilt 
maubt 
laid en 



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tutrtf 5 a [23^; JL j,i, o, 

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7ronf S leva Hon 




%q\\ Section 



Finished grade S 




Hear Slevaiion 



skill Seciion 



Right Side 
Slevaiion 




Qraphic 
Scales 



ELEVATION? 




JOefi Side 
Glevaiion 




Finished grade 



Il-M. 



TWO STORY AND 

BASEMENT; 5 BED- 

ROOMS 




The multitude of the small conveniences which mark the difference 
between a mere house and a comfortable home characterize these plans. 
There is a large and well-lit powder room opening off the first floor hall; 
the library contains book shelves and a cheery fireplace; a small closet 
of just the right dimensions to take card tables is tucked in beside the 
living room fireplace. The breakfast room will accommodate a round 
table and chairs as well as the usual long table and benches. To enter the 
two-car garage, one need not walk through the kitchen; the inside garage 
door may be reached through a hall adjacent to the library. The cellar 
contains a lavatory, a bar and a game room. On the second floor are four 
master bedrooms served by two connecting baths; and a maid's room with 
its own bath. More than enough closets to satisfy the housewife are also 
provided. 

The architect is R. Franklin Outcalt. As originally built, the exterior 
walls are faced with brick of a light grayish color, the woodwork around 
windows and doors is painted oyster white and the shutters a very dark 
green. Other combinations of colors or other structural clay materials 
as specified in the sections on the reverse are equally appropriate. The 
volume totals approximately 49,000 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

BASEMENT 



SECOND FLOOR 




FIRST FLOOR 





H-l-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W, — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Hoof 
Sheaf hi ng 




Of all Sectioyi 



''-f-T- 




Ltbraru 



front £ leva! iovi 




Finished arade 



Rear £ leva t ion 




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graphic Scales 




Finished t^rade- 



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$ng 



jCeft Side Slevafio 



n 



fag hi Side Elevation 



11-2-1* 



TWO STORY AND 

BASEMENT; 5 BED 

ROOMS 




A large family requiring five bedrooms including 
servant's accommodations and yet desiring to reduce 
their expenditure to a minimum, will find this plan 
eminently suitable. There is ample closet space and 
also space for an excellent basement recreation room. 



Mann & MacNeille are the architects. The exterior 
might appropriately be developed in the warm rich 
tones of structural clay tile as well as in the brick fac- 
ing illustrated. The volume totals approximately 49,500 
cubic feet. 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, !nc 1427 Eye Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 



BASEMENT 



FIRST FLOOR 



SECOND FLOOR 





SUM 
PORCH 
cl : o\U"lo - 



«^Myp-" □ 




- 





H-2-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc, 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 




Finished Grade J t &rtck SfepS 

Jroni Slevaiion 




Brtck S/epf •■ Finished Grade > &nch. Step 

Jjeft Side Slevation 



Right Side Slevation 






graphic Scales 



ELEVATIONS 






%a\\ Section 



Rear Slevation 



9fall Section 



H-3-G 

TWO STORY AND 

BASEMENT; 5 BED 

ROOMS 




Every inch of space in this plan is used to produce 
the maximum of comfort and efficiency without in any 
way sacrificing the exterior appearance. For in- 
stance, the entrance hall in addition to giving access 
to stairs and to a first floor lavatory, contains a coat 
closet, a telephone closet, and a small towel closet off 
the lavatory. In the living room are built-in hook 
shelves and a comfortable window seat beside the 
fireplace. In most of the four master bedrooms there 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc 1427 Eye Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 



are at least two possible locations for beds. 

The architects are Mann & MacNeille, Red brick 
in a wide range of colors was originally used for the 
exterior facing, the bricks being set on edge or, as 
the architects say, "Rolok" fashion. Buff or gray brick 
laid similarly, or clay tile in larger units, will serve 
equally well. The volume totals approximately 50,500 
cubic feet. 



BASEMENT 



FIRST FLOOR 



SECOND FLOOR 






H-3-G 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Ironi Slevaiion 




Brick StepJ 



Finished Grade 










%all Sections 



Kighi Side Slevaiion 



Metal 
leaders 




Kear Slevaiion 





firick Step S finished Grade 

£eft Side Slevaiion 



graphic 
Scales 



ELEVATIONS 



11-1-4; 



TWO STORY AND 
BASEMENT; 5 BED- 
ROOMS 




SECOND FLOOR 



FIRST FLOOR 




This efficient plan provides all the requisites for comfortable living and 
yet the house is "within reach of the average pocket book. Notice the first 
floor lavatory, the convenient access to the main stairs from both the kitchen 
and the hall, the breakfast room contained within the pantry, and the 
secluded stairs leading to the servant's room. The kitchen entry gives access 
to a two-car garage as well as to service portions of the house. 

The architects are Mann & MacNeille. Any type of structural clay 
product is suitable for the exterior, as will be seen upon examining the de- 
tails on the reverse of this sheet. The volume totals 50,500 cu. ft. 

STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 
1427 Eye Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 




II- Mp 



STRUCTURAL CLAY PRODUCTS INSTITUTE, Inc. 

1427 EYE STREET, N. W. — WASHINGTON, D. C 






Finished Grade' 



* Brick Step 

Ironi Slevation 




Garage 
floor 




Rear Slevation 



Wall 
Section 



Qvfiphic Scales 



ELEVATIONS 



%all 

Section 



12" O V 




Finished Oracle 



Finished Grade 



/eh Side Slevation 



Riqnt Side Slevation 



"■^^■PIIBp 




POSTON-SPRINGFIELD BRICK CO. 

2600 EAST SOUTH GRAND AVE. 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS